With the upcoming primary election, government teachers are preparing seniors with the knowledge of the government’s ins and outs. The most importantly is the voting process by which candidates and eventually the president is chosen.

Story by Chyna Wallace,  Trey Rice, Malik Brazile

With the upcoming primary election, government teachers are preparing seniors with the knowledge of the government’s ins and outs. The most importantly is the voting process by which candidates and eventually the president is chosen. Government teachers are teaching their students the importance on why they should vote in this primary election.

“I’ve taught students the basic rights and responsibilities of their citizenship,” government teacher Libby Bryan said. “Democracy is fragile and participation is absolutely required for it to last. You owe it to all the people that sacrificed before you, to do everything you can to keep this country strong.”

For students that are old enough to vote, they are starting to understand the importance of giving their opinion on who should be elected into office next.

“Voting is important because people can get involved in their country. It’s the way we show how we want things to be run,” senior Maddie Kimmel said.

When citizens don’t vote, they don’t put their opinion out there, they don’t get to help make a difference in their country. They feel as though their opinion doesn’t matter.

“If you don’t exercise your right to vote, what was the purpose of breaking away from England?,” Bryan said. “If you don’t vote, it means that you are saying to yourself, “‘I don’t matter.’”. If you don’t exercise your right to vote, what was the point of the 19th and 15th amendments?. It’s important to vote because it shows that you do matter.”

Even when someone is not old enough to vote, they can still help out and put their opinion out there. Even if someone can’t vote, they can still promote candidates.

“You can use social media to get their name out there. Create signs and put them in your yard or at work. So long as it’s appropriate, promote who you support and get their name out there,” senior Jeffrey Swinton said.

For people who can’t vote just yet, just learning about their own political views and speaking up about them can help support candidates.

“I think if you can’t vote, to support someone you learn everything you can about your own political views and share it with people you know,” Bryan said.

But, when deciding about their own political views, parents can play a role when the students are making that choice.

“I think my parents influence me a lot on what party to vote for so I trust them to know what’s best to support this country,” Maddie said.

Political views aren’t the only thing stopping people from voting, it’s also what qualities the students are looking for when choosing the right person to be the next president.

“A good president should have good leadership and selflessness,” freshman Emily Dale said.

Political views and parent’s influence sometimes aren’t the case when deciding who to vote for in the primary elections. The constitution makes no mention of political parties so that citizens would never be inclined to support groups into power. Sometimes a voter should look at just what they think is best for the country rather than what others want.

“My parents don’t go based on Rrepublicans and Ddemocrats. They go on what’s best for them and the country,” senior Austin Brunt said. “That shows me to look at candidates as individuals and not as a group.”