With the release of the most recent school production, The Crucible, Dutch Fork thespians have been honing their on-stage skills. Theatre allows students to shine on stage through their roles.

Story byTrey Rice, Chyna Wallace and Malik Brazille

Photo by Robert Sawyer

With the release of the most recent school production, The Crucible, Dutch Fork thespians have been honing their on-stage skills. Theatre allows students to shine on stage through their roles. All of these roles are what allows students to improve by practicing on stage and learning how cooperate with their fellow actors.
“I’ve grown a lot in my dramatic acting due to my participation in The Crucible and learning to act more closely with my fellow cast mates,” junior Lyndsey Brown said.

Acting in school productions allows students to form new or stronger friendships. It’s these friendships that help the actors in future productions by having experience with working together.

“My favorite part about doing The Crucible is the precious time I’ve been able to spend with my friends and the close bonds I’ve built,” junior Kianna Flemming said.

Theatre allows students to become used to acting and use their skills in the future to pursue careers in drama. For those not interested in pursuing a career in drama, theatre can present an opportunity for students to just have fun doing something they enjoy.

“Working with the cast was my favorite part because everyone was easy to get along with and everyone was patient with one another,” senior Malik Walker said.

The actors think that by participating in the play, they learned to perform in new ways they never have before.

“Learning to listen and taking constructive criticism are some of the things that I benefited from the production because it made me perform better than ever before,” Malik said.

This production has a darker and more serious tone than other school productions and proves that not every story has a happily ever after.

The Crucible is such an intense show. I’m used to doing upbeat and happy shows, but The Crucible doesn’t have a happy ending. It was a refreshing change,” Lyndsey said.

The darker tone allows actors to explore a new area of acting with a unique use of storytelling and drama.

“It is very dramatic and tense. It really allows the actors to explore a different level of material in terms of storyline and characterization,” drama teacher Jessica Fichter said.

With this darker change in tone, there is also a slight increase in the difficulty of acting as actors require more concentration and understanding of the material and characters. With Fichter’s help, Dutch Fork actors were able to overcome these obstacles.

It is always beneficial to tackle something new and challenging,” Fichter said. “I think the students learned a lot about the physicality of characters in highly emotional situations and how to keep the pace of a drama moving and engaging for the audience.”

All the actors agree that being in the production has been a fun and interesting experience with a darker atmosphere. They each look forward to participating in other productions in the future.

“I would participate in another play. I’m practicing for my career. I want to be a theatre professor and I need all the experience I can get,” Kianna said. “Theatre kids are the best and it’s such a safe environment. It’s been a great influence on my life.”