The South Carolina democratic primary was held on February 27, 2016. Several South Carolinians, including a few members of our very own student body, placed their ballots and watched as the results unfolded.

The South Carolina democratic primary was held on February 27, 2016. Several South Carolinians, including a few members of our very own student body, placed their ballots and watched as the results unfolded.
“I did register in time to vote in the primary but I had to vote absentee because I was working that Saturday,” senior Hillary Clinton fellow Abby Beauregard said.
Many other students of voting age or qualification also voted. The race came down to two potential candidates: Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders as all other democratic competitors dropped out. For many, this didn’t come as a shock as these were the only relevant democratic options.
“Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton have similar platforms, but I support Bernie because he’s been solid on his positions for much longer than Hillary has,” senior Carly McGregor said. “He’s been fighting for racial equality and defending the LGBT community for decades, so I know his stances won’t be swayed by what is considered popular to believe in.”
There is a fair amount of dialog going on about who the best candidate would be to put up in the general election: most of it still inconsistent.
“I support Hillary because I think she’s the best candidate for the job. We share a lot of the same values and ideas and I’m ready to see a woman in the Oval Office,” Abby said.
Senior Katie Samonsky agrees that Hillary Clinton confronts the countries issues with a strong platform and a firm stance.
Not only did students vote, some also had a hand I’m the preparation for this occasion and got a chance to support their cause and let their voices be heard.
“I’ve been working as a fellow, which is basically an intern, on the Hillary Clinton campaign since June. My job entails phone banking, door to door canvassing, and doing whatever needed to be done around the office,”  Abby said.
Katie has also taken part in the Clinton campaign. Teachers are also pitching in to help students be more aware of politics by giving extra credit to those who participate in campaigns or attend other political events.
“In AP Gov, we received extra credit for political participation, so I went to a few phone banks with Abby,” Katie said.
Other students participated by spreading awareness of the election with friends, and making sure everyone got out to vote.
“First and foremost, vote. Potential voters can register at scvotes.org, and it takes less than five minutes. Voter turnout in South Carolina is pretty low, so help a friend register, too” said Carly, “It’s important that people clearly understand their options, and vote for the candidate with whom their beliefs most closely align,” Carly said.
At the end of the night, votes were counted and Clinton won with 39 delegates over Sanders’s 14. This was a victory for Clinton, but it was also a victory here at home.
“Campaign work is exhausting but it’s extremely rewarding when your candidate wins especially, like with Hillary, by such a large margin,” Abby said, “Election night was an incredible experience and I feel so fortunate I was there to help witness history.”

Photo by Robert Sawyer

Story by Zakiya Austin, Maddie Mason and Sarah Emily Rish