It is around the time of year where seniors get geared up to choose what college they want to go to. While many choose schools like USC, Clemson or Coastal Carolina, Midlands tech has very broad college options for South Carolina students after high school but is it the right choice?

It is around the time of year where seniors get geared up to choose what college they want to go to. While many choose schools like USC, Clemson or Coastal Carolina, Midlands tech has very broad college options for South Carolina students after high school but is it the right choice?

Midlands Tech is a technical college that focuses on hands on career training. There are one or two year programs available for people who want to earn an associate’s degree.

Midlands has a variety of programs ranging from business to their very popular nursing program.

Most high school students choose midlands because of the uncertainty of the career path they want to take or they don’t have the best grades to go straight into a 4 year college or university.

For students that don’t have the grades to go head first into a four year college, midlands gives them the chance to make it up by completing two years for an associates degree.

These students also have the chance to bridge or transfer. The concept of bridging is to complete your freshman and sophomore year of college at midlands then your junior and senior year at the college you choose.

The concept seems great right? But what about the students that don’t have the grades to go straight to a four year college or that wants to go to Midlands but they do not offer the major for them to pursue what they want to study?

What do they do?

It sounds like they will be forced to study in a course that won’t relate to their career path until they have enough credit hours to transfer to a school that supports their career path.

Midlands isn’t the only school that would relate to this problem though. Most technical colleges focus on conventional career paths like business, engineering, agriculture and nursing.

Now the student whose major isn’t offered at Midlands are either forced to go to their specific trade school–which isn’t a bad idea–but all they will receive is a  certification to do that specific trade and nothing else.

Story by Zakiya Austin, Malik Brazile and Sarah Emily Rish

Photo by Sarah Emily Rish