img_9927Story by Trey Martin and Destiny White, photo by Trey Martin

 

On November 1, numerous colleges from around the southeast were in attendance for the school’s College Application Day, where students are able to receive help and get tips on how to navigate through a school’s application.

“I think college application day is important because it gives kids who don’t know how to handle a college application some assistance,” senior Madison Brown said.

The goal of the day was to give students some assistance that will help them through one of the most difficult and stressful times in their educational careers.

“It helps me make sure that I don’t mess up or anything and that it looks good and is ready to go,” senior Michael Templeton said.

The college application day follows the school’s annual college fair, which was held in October in the school’s gym.

“The college fair is an excellent event for our eleventh and twelfth graders to get to talk to several different colleges around the area. We had over fifty colleges come to our college fair this week,” school counselor Allison Allgood said.

Lasting from ten to two, students came prepared with their social security number, transcript, test scores, and a means to pay for the application, as well as having their application’s essay pre-written.

“Even though college application day is from ten to two, you won’t be in there the whole time and it’s not a good time to start your essay. You want your essay to be well thought out,” Allgood said.

There are many benefits to taking advantage of the application day. Some colleges will waive their fee to apply, and there will be admission counselors from various schools around the state in attendance to answer questions.

“Filling out an application is hard, and if you do it on that day you have good counselors there that can help you through the process rather than leaving the question blank or providing the wrong information,” english teacher Allison Norwood said.

Some students are already prepared for what the applications will ask of them, as they have already started the process.

“Typically they ask personal questions such as the clubs you’re in, the activities you do, the community service and things like that,” Madison said.

Adults who have already been through the process offered their advice to students currently applying to college.

“You always have your goal, your dream of college, but you have to have a backup plan. You can shoot for the stars, but then you need to have something else where you’re grounded in reality,” Norwood said.

While the process can be stressful, students should remember to be true to themselves.

“Don’t worry about what your grades say or what your test scores are as much as a student makes sure that they tell who they are,” Allgood said. “Everybody has a story, and that’s really what the admissions counselors are looking for.”