Story by Alexandria Sessions

Even though the dispute about using Chromebooks over iPads has been settled and Chromebooks came out on top, many students who prefer paper over technology fight a new battle.

Imagine having to write  a paper with an iPad; then compare that to writing a paper on the Chromebook.

The pros and cons are evident and teachers are recognizing it, but could they be abusing this new technology too much?

A teacher’s argument could be that it saves trees and the countless stacks of paper could be reduced; however paper could be efficient for certain subjects.

In English classes, the usage of paper and the chromebook would most likely be leveled because students will opt to type some papers, write papers, and most times do both at one time.

Using Chromebooks with math there is easy access to homework help, online tutoring, and of course a student favorite, Desmos. But paper will most likely be using in that class.

Teachers have to consider cheating also.

The whole point of a quiz is to let the teacher know the student is learning the material and is aware on how to get answers to questions provided.

Paper is also efficient in this way because there isn’t really a way to show your steps, in math, on a computer.

Science and social studies are also  classes that has a balanced usage of paper and technology, for one you can’t cut someone up in class to view a cell.

In social studies many historical findings and analyzations are not always going to be on paper and teachers won’t be able to get their hands on the real thing.

The main concern seems to be having to take a test or a quiz on the computer.

Studies show that reading from a hard copy helps with concentration which makes sense in English classes.

Highlighting and annotating helps the reader better understand the text.

Some teachers should provide a hard copy for the ones who learn better by physically writing out the copy.

The same goes for test taking.

Being able to eliminate answer choices and distinguish between the two good answers, goes a long way.

Both technology and the classic pencil and paper benefits a classroom, so neither one is more efficient than the other.

But by giving the student an option to choose how they would like to learn could be the betterment for the student.