Story by Stephen Wise, Morgan Wilkenson, and Caroline Hine

Photo by Tiffany Robinson

 

Dutch Fork students know Floyd White as an administrator, but there is another side to the assistant principal that most students are not aware of. White was an avid basketball player in high school, and was coached by Dutch Fork’s own varsity basketball coach, Bret Jones.

“He has told me that he played basketball,” Administrator Jo Howe said, “He loves to go in there and watch them practice. He talks about Coach Jones being an influence in his life and how cool it is that he is back there with the same coach.”

Not only did Coach Jones teach White about basketball, he taught him life lessons that he still carries with him now and utilizes in his role as an administrator.

“After I got a technical he said ‘I was running for that’ and I said ‘No I am not’ and I could tell that it was taken personally by him and I apologized to him. That was an enlightenment to because I realized you can hurt people’s opinions by how you respond,” White said.

During his time working as a teacher at Dutch Fork Middle and an administrator at Dutch Fork High, White has made a good impression on the students, staff, and Dutch Fork community.

“I’ve known him since he was a middle school teacher and he is very ambitious and very into the “big picture” of schools and the district,” Howe said, “He wants to know all the pieces and parts of how a middle school and high school work.”

Although many years have passed since White played under Coach Jones, the strong relationship they had as player and coach remains largely the same in their professional careers.

“It is rewarding. There is no sort of ego involved, if anything I am grateful for the opportunity to work with him in a sense. To be honest, I almost felt like our dialogue and report is similar to what it was like as a player and a coach,” said White,  “He knew that I was pretty opinionated and outspoken and the contexts of the conversation are pretty much the same.”
White goes by the basketball practices and helps out when he can, offering tips and suggestions for the players that his years of playing experience have taught him. This allows him to embrace his passion for the game even further.

“If I was not an administrator, I would be coaching because I have a love for the game,” White said, “I don’t mind getting in practice sometimes, and when I see adjustments that need to be done and I state it. However, I try not to overshadow him and his authority.”  

The athletic perspective of sports is not all that matters to White. Along with the sport itself, Coach Jones and his ability to lead had a lasting impact on White and helped shape him into the person he is today. He wants to leave an influence on Dutch Fork students that is similar to the influence Coach Jones left on him.

“He thinks a lot of what Coach Jones is doing here so he will go and watch practices and know all the kids and their stories and when we watch games he can tell me things about each kid,” Howe said, “He tries to do things for kids here like Coach Jones did for him.”